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Bob Hilliard
Bob Hilliard
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12-Year-Old Boy Drowns At Pool Party In Centennial

2 comments

Arapahoe County authorities are investigating the drowning death of a 12-year-old boy.

Sheriff Grayson Robinson says the boy died Sunday evening after being pulled from the pool at the Southglenn Country Club. He was there for a private birthday party and was pulled from the pool by another child after being found underwater in the shallow end.

Two lifeguards tried to resuscitate him but he was later pronounced dead at Littleton Hospital.

The sheriff says the drowning appears to have been accident but investigators are looking into the death.

Having two lifeguards at the scene and having another child pull the victim from the scene is totally unexcusable. Certainly these lifeguards were inattentive or poorly trained. It is unfortunate that these types of accidents happen when they are 100% preventable.

2 Comments

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  1. Jimmy says:
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    This incident was clearly tragic, and never should have happened. I was not there, so take that for what it is worth, but I am an experienced lifeguard. Often times these incidents are called “silent drowning” This is when a victim silently slips below the surface with out a surface struggle, and not noise or motion is made. They literally sink and die. Drowning almost never occur like Hollywood portrays them to be, the traditional waving of the arms and yelling help. That is not how it happens.

    As a lifeguard I can’t make mistakes, because if I do, some one can die. If something like this were to happen to me I would feel not only horrible, but responsible. But I must also say the parents are at more fault then the lifeguards. Lifeguards are watching anywhere from 1 to 100 kids at a time. Parents have a hard time watching their own kid for two minutes.

    My view on the matter is that the Parents should be the first ones in the water, because it is there kid. But this is often times not the case. Parents are too busy socializing, and acting terribly irresponsible leaving the task of watching their kids to the lifeguards who are often times over whelmed. Even the best trained lifeguards may not have been able to prevent this tragedy.

    My point is that before saying the lifeguards were poorly trained, how about you look at where the fault stems at. And that is the parents. It is impossible for the lifeguard to watch every single kid, and it is the parent’s legal obligation to protect their kids.

    So before anyone goes blaming the lifeguards, who most likely were very attentive, and acted by the book when doing life support measures. They just simply did not have their eyes on that kid at that exact moment. It only takes 15 seconds for a child to drown. So before anyone blames the lifeguards, you should ask where were the parents, and why were they not the first ones in the water. It is their job to protect their kids, so why did they fail that badly.

  2. David Benke says:
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    Too bad these comments are coming from people who do not have all the facts. There were lifeguards. We do not know if it was a case of silent drowning or not. The boy was an excellent swimmer. Medal winner on the swim team. He was in the shallow end of the pool. There were many children in the pool with him. They got him out and were very close to reviving him. The families are very close and are devastated. Perhaps we should wait for full results and investigation before judging. This is a tragedy and not all tragedies can be solved by throwing a lawyer at them. Sometimes we want to ask God why bad things happen to good people.